Stolperstein

Dec 27, 2018

FRITZ ASCHER SOCIETY Newsletter #24, December 2018

2019-01-14T00:10:25+00:00December 27th, 2018|Newsletter|Comments Off on FRITZ ASCHER SOCIETY Newsletter #24, December 2018

Dear Friends, I am filled with gratitude for your interest and support that enabled us this year to initiate and organize five exhibitions, numerous lectures and exhibition tours, two world premiere concerts featuring musical interpretations of Fritz Ascher’s poems by Potsdam composer Gisbert Näther, as well as the emotional ceremony placing a stumbling block in front of Niklasstraße 21/23 in Berlin-Zehlendorf memorizing Fritz Ascher at the location of his parental home. Thank you to everyone who made these events possible! Thank you to Wolfgang Gustavus, whose unexpected death deeply saddens us, for donating works by Fritz Ascher to the Potsdam Museum and Museum Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf Berlin. As 2018 is winding down, I hope you are enjoying some peace and fun [...]

Sep 4, 2018

FRITZ ASCHER SOCIETY Newsletter #22, September 2018

2018-11-26T05:40:08+00:00September 4th, 2018|Newsletter|Comments Off on FRITZ ASCHER SOCIETY Newsletter #22, September 2018

Dear Friends, I know, this summer I seem obsessed with Fritz Ascher’s I know, this summer I seem obsessed with Fritz Ascher’s Dancers from 1921. But there is one more thought about the drawing that I want to share. Fritz Ascher, Dancers, 1921. Private collection. Photo Malcolm Varon ©2018 Bianca Stock Fritz Ascher, Dancers, 1921. Private collection. Photo Malcolm Varon ©2018 Bianca Stock When the drawing was created,“Freikörperkultur” (FKK) or “free body culture” had become popular in Germany. Founded in 1898 in Essen, Germany, the nudist culture was about celebrating the body unencumbered by clothes, in nature and sunlight. Many of the naturists came from the Wandervogel movement, the pre-eminent German youth movement, founded to escape the repressive and [...]

Mar 23, 2018

FRITZ ASCHER SOCIETY Newsletter #19, March 2018

2018-12-04T11:47:15+00:00March 23rd, 2018|Newsletter|Comments Off on FRITZ ASCHER SOCIETY Newsletter #19, March 2018

Dear Friends, I was touched by how many neighbors and friends from near and far came out into the chilly but sunny winter weather on February 21 to celebrate Fritz Ascher and recognize his persecution by the National Socialists by laying a “Stolperstein” (stumbling stone) at Niklasstraße 21/23 in Berlin-Zehlendorf, where his family lived from 1909. Thank you to the anonymous donor for making this event possible, to Dirk Jordan (AG Stolpersteine), Michael Rohrmann (Projekt Stolpersteine) and Wolfgang Ellerbrock for organizing it, to Cornelie von Bismarck for creating a beautiful context, and to Sabine Witt from Museum Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf in Berlin and Jutta Götzmann from Potsdam Museum for supporting it. A special thank you to the students from Potsdam for reciting [...]

Feb 8, 2018

FRITZ ASCHER SOCIETY Newsletter #18, February 2018

2018-12-04T11:50:09+00:00February 8th, 2018|Newsletter|Comments Off on FRITZ ASCHER SOCIETY Newsletter #18, February 2018

Dear Friends, Fritz Ascher is getting a “Stolperstein” (stumbling stone)! Please join us for the ceremony on Wednesday, February 21 at 11:00am at Niklasstr. 21/23 in Berlin-Zehlendorf Stolpersteine (stumbling stones) is a project of the artist Gunter Demnig. The project commemorates people who were persecuted by the Nazis between 1933 and 1945. Stolpersteine are concrete blocks measuring 10x10cm which are laid into the pavement in front of the last voluntarily chosen places of residence of the victims of the Nazis. Their names and fate are engraved into a brass plate on the top of each Stolperstein. In Berlin, thousands Stolpersteine were installed since 1996. Today, Stolpersteine can be found in 1099 German cities and in 20 European countries. (link) We [...]

Feb 4, 2016

Fritz Ascher Society Newsletter #5, February 2016

2018-12-04T12:45:14+00:00February 4th, 2016|Newsletter|Comments Off on Fritz Ascher Society Newsletter #5, February 2016

Dear Friends, As I am writing this newsletter, the snow is (still) melting here in New York after one of the largest snow storms in recent history. At the same time, Carnival is in the air - at least for our German friends. What better moment to introduce Fritz Ascher's clowns - a theme that occupied the artist throughout his career. It was certainly no coincidence that Ruggero Leoncavallo's opera "Pagliacci" (Clowns) was hugely popular in Weimar Republic Berlin - especially the performances with the best known Tenor of his time, Enrico Caruso, as Canio. Fritz Ascher, Bajazzo, 1916 In the opera, Canio, the head of a troupe of comedians, finds out that his wife Nedda has an affair with [...]