2019, March 18 – Art With Hillary – Part II

2019, March 18 – Art With Hillary – Part II

What If? The Life And Work of Fritz Ascher Part II”

 http://artwithhillary.blogspot.com

(scroll down for translation into German)

‘Golgotha’ (1915), by Fritz Ascher, in which inflections of Pieter Bruegel the Elder coalesce with James Ensor to create a scene of pandemonium and horror. ©Bianca Stock
Fritz Ascher (1893 – 1970), Untergehende Sonne (Sunset), c. 1960,
oil on canvas, 49.2 × 50 in. ( 125 × 126 cm) Private collection.
Photo: Malcolm Varon. © Bianca Stock

This is Part II of the blog post on the exhibition Fritz Ascher: Expressionist at New York University’s Grey Art Gallery.  Please see ArtWithHillary, February 2019 for Part I.

From 1942 until the end of the war in 1945, Fritz Ascher (1893 – 1970) was hidden from the Nazis by Martha Grassman (1881 – 1971).  Her home was in Grunewald, a famous forest area of Berlin noted for its pine and oak trees.  In the late nineteenth century, Grunewald became an upper class enclave of mansions.  The houses were separated from one another by large plots of land.  Thus, when the Nazis took over some of the villas during the war, nearby homes were concealed by heavy forestation which accounts for one reason Ascher remained undiscovered.

‘Golgotha’ (1915), by Fritz Ascher, in which inflections of Pieter Bruegel the Elder coalesce with James Ensor to create a scene of pandemonium and horror. ©Bianca Stock
Fritz Ascher (1893 – 1970), Hunting Castle Grunewald/Jagdschloss Grunewald, c. 1963,
white gouache over black ink and watercolor on paper,
20.3 × 17.7 in. (51.5 × 45 cm). Private collection
Photo: Malcolm Varon. © Bianca Stock

Berlin was heavily bombed in 1945.  On April 25, 1945, three days before the Americans liberated Berlin, air raids destroyed most of Ascher’s artwork left with friends.

EDVARD MUNCH
Dream has often touched
your Being.
As dusking and dawning
Of what comes to pass.
As beautiful gracefulness of a Stillness, in which it glimmers, Yet disappears.
In which you linger, Sunken down you push on, trust and distant things
are reconciled.
(Poems Vol. 4, p. 150 (157), no. 213)

In hiding Ascher could not paint or draw.  He turned to writing poetry.  A typescript selection of thirty-one of his poems, in German and English translation, is available to visitors near the video display. Ascher’s subjects range from salutations to his artistic heroes like Beethoven or Munch (see above), thoughts on loved ones and nature. They reveal an extraordinary spirit which finds joy and wonder in the world.

SONG OF LOVE
Love flowers,
extending and eternal.
Always I feel
myself excited
by all the changes
by all the paths,
always
I feel myself aglow with passion.

Whether surging
with fulfillment,
showing my
yearning bestilled –
Whether the end of woe – .
Love flowers so.
Extended –
it was eternal.
(Poems Vol. 2, undated (ca. 1942–45), p. 223, no. 395)

Now in his fifties, his post-war life narrowed.  No longer the socially expansive being of his youth, Ascher remained in his studio nearly a recluse. He took long walks in the nearby Grunewald forest alone or with his girlfriend, who lived across the street.  Friendly but never seeking to widen his personal or artistic contacts, he worked.

‘Golgotha’ (1915), by Fritz Ascher, in which inflections of Pieter Bruegel the Elder coalesce with James Ensor to create a scene of pandemonium and horror. ©Bianca Stock
Fritz Ascher (1893 – 1970), Landscape with Trees/Hügelige Landschaft mit Bäumen, c. 1960
oil on canvas, 27.6 × 31.5 in. (70 × 80 cm). Private collection
Photo: Malcolm Varon. © Bianca Stock
He was not interested in exhibiting, selling or teaching art, turning down a teaching appointment at the Art Academy in Berlin.  He had a successful show in 1946 and one in 1947.  After that, it was not until 1969 that the famous art dealer Rudolph Springer persuaded him to exhibit twenty-one paintings at his gallery.
After the war, he first worked on his earlier canvases that had survived.  He would add impressionistic strokes – colorful confetti-like spots that almost obscure the original image.
‘Golgotha’ (1915), by Fritz Ascher, in which inflections of Pieter Bruegel the Elder coalesce with James Ensor to create a scene of pandemonium and horror. ©Bianca Stock
Fritz Ascher (1893 – 1970), Beethoven, 1924/1945
oil on canvas, 38.5 × 47 in. (97.5 × 119 cm). Private collection
Photo: Malcolm Varon. © Bianca Stock

He sold his ration cards to purchase art supplies. Now nature replaced figurative representations.  Sunsets, sunrises, meadows, woodlands, flowers and trees dominated his work.

‘Golgotha’ (1915), by Fritz Ascher, in which inflections of Pieter Bruegel the Elder coalesce with James Ensor to create a scene of pandemonium and horror. ©Bianca Stock
Fritz Ascher (1893 – 1970), Sunset/Sonnenuntergang, c. 1960
oil on canvas, 49.2 × 50 in. (125 × 126 cm). Private collection
Photo: Malcolm Varon. © Bianca Stock

In Ascher’s c. 1960 Sunset/Sonnenuntergang, bold brushstrokes mingle with painterly drips.  The drips fall in every direction indicating the artist turned the still-wet canvas around while painting, creating a highly charged landscape that burst with expression.

‘Golgotha’ (1915), by Fritz Ascher, in which inflections of Pieter Bruegel the Elder coalesce with James Ensor to create a scene of pandemonium and horror. ©Bianca Stock
Installation view of exhibition Fritz Ascher: Expressionist, January 9 – April 6, 2019, Grey Art Gallery, New York University
l.  Two Trees/Zwei Bäume, c. 1963, white gouache over black ink and watercolor on paper, 21.5 x 17.8 in. (54.6 x 45 cm), Private collection
r.  Two Trees/Zwei Bäume, c. 1963, black ink and watercolor on paper, 26 × 17.8 in. (66 × 45 cm), Private collection
Photo: Hillary Ganton. © Bianca Stock

Oils, gouaches and watercolors of thick-trunked mature trees and thin-trunked saplings come alive with anthropomorphic characterization.

‘Golgotha’ (1915), by Fritz Ascher, in which inflections of Pieter Bruegel the Elder coalesce with James Ensor to create a scene of pandemonium and horror. ©Bianca Stock
Fritz Ascher (1893 – 1970), Trees in Hilly Landscape/Bäume in Hügeliger Landschaft, 1968,
white gouache over black ink and watercolor on paper, 27.6 × 31.5 in. (70 × 80 cm). Private collection
Photo: Malcolm Varon. © Bianca Stock

The Trees in Hilly Landscape/Bäume in Hügeliger Landschaft, 1968, Ascher’s last known dated work which is the final work in the Grey Art Gallery exhibition, depicts four trees – three on left side of the canvas and one on the right.  Between them is a patch of greens and yellows delineating the rise of a small hill above which is a blue-and-white sky. As opposed to earlier woodland oils where the trees conceal any clearing, this late work’s center opens up to light.  The following undated poem takes up the same motif.

SUN-SPECKLED WOOD
Through its mystery
The light gilds –
In the glimmer, warm gleaming
Glittering.
And everything living
Was doubly singing.
There where it fondles kissingly –
: a Love gushes up Without equal.
(Poems Vol. 1, undated, p. 92)

Ascher died on March 26, 1970.  He was buried in a municipal cemetery in southwestern Berlin.  Martha passed away the following year on January 24 and was buried next to him.

Please do not miss this show.

Fritz Ascher: Expressionist
January 9 – April 6, 2019
100 Washington Square East, Manhattan
Hours:
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays: 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Wednesdays: 11:00 am – 8:00 pm
Saturdays: 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Closed Sundays and Mondays.
Also closed  Memorial Day Weekend, and Independence Day, Thanksgiving Weekend, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.

“Was Wäre Wenn? Das Leben und Werk von Fritz Ascher. 2. Teil”

Dies ist Teil II des Blogbeitrags zur Ausstellung Fritz Ascher: Expressionist in der Grey Art Gallery der New York University. Siehe auch ArtWithHillary, Februar 2019 für Teil I.

Von 1942 bis Kriegsende 1945 wurde Fritz Ascher (1893 – 1970) von Martha Grassman (1881 – 1971) vor den Nazis versteckt. Ihr Zuhause war im Grunewald, einem berühmten Waldgebiet von Berlin, das für seine Kiefern und Eichen bekannt ist. Im späten 19. Jahrhundert wurde das Grunewaldviertel zu einer Enklave der Villen der Oberschicht. Die Häuser waren durch große Grundstücke voneinander getrennt. Als die Nazis während des Krieges einige der Villen übernahmen, wurden die umliegenden Häuser durch die starke Bewaldung verdeckt. Dies ist einer der Gründe, warum Ascher unentdeckt blieb.

Berlin wurde 1945 schwer bombardiert. Am 25. April 1945, drei Tage vor der Befreiung Berlins durch die Amerikaner, zerstörten Luftangriffe den größten Teil von Aschers Kunstwerken, die er bei Freunden hinterlassen hatte.

EDWARD MUNCH
Traum hat Dein Wesen
Oft berührt.
Als Graun und Dämmern
Des Ereignen.
Als schöne Anmut einer
Stille, in der es leuchtet,
Doch entweicht.
In der Du weilst,
Versunken treibest,
Vertraut und Ferne
Sich vergleicht.
(Gedichtband 4, undatiert, S. 150 (157), Nr. 213)

Im Verborgenen konnte Ascher nicht malen oder zeichnen. Er wandte sich dem Schreiben von Gedichten zu. In der Nähe des Videodisplays steht den Besuchern eine Typoskriptauswahl von 31 seiner Gedichte in deutscher und englischer Übersetzung zur Verfügung. Aschers Themen reichen von Anreden seiner künstlerischen Helden wie Beethoven oder Munch (siehe oben) bis hin zu Gedanken über geliebte Personen und die Natur. Sie enthüllen einen außergewöhnlichen Geist, der in der Welt Freude und Staunen findet.

LIED DER LIEBE
Liebe blühet,
längst und ewig.
Immer fühl
ichs mir bewegen –
Allem Wandel,
allen Wegen,
immer
fühl ichs mir erglühn.

Ob es brandend sich
erfüllt,
weisend meine
Sehnsucht stillte –
Obs entweht -.
Liebe blüht es.
Längst –
war Ewig.
(Gedichtband 2, undatiert (ca. 1942-1945), S. 223, Nr. 395)

Nun in seinen Fünfzigern, verengte sich sein Leben in den Nachkriegsjahren. Ascher, nicht mehr das sozial expansive Wesen seiner Jugend, blieb in seinem Atelier fast ein Einsiedler. Er machte lange Spaziergänge im nahe gelegenen Grunewald, allein oder mit seiner Freundin, die auf der anderen Straßenseite lebte. Freundlich, aber niemals bestrebt, seine persönlichen oder künstlerischen Kontakte zu erweitern, arbeitete er.

Er hatte kein Interesse daran, Kunst auszustellen, zu verkaufen oder zu unterrichten, und lehnte einen Lehrauftrag an der Kunstakademie in Berlin ab. Er stellte erfolgreich aus im Jahr 1946 und eine im Jahr 1947. Danach dauerte es bis 1969, dass der berühmte Kunsthändler Rudolph Springer ihn überzeugte, 19 Kunstwerke in seiner Galerie auszustellen.

Nach dem Krieg arbeitete er zuerst an seinen früheren Leinwänden, die überlebt hatten. Er fügte impressionistische Pinselstriche hinzu – bunte konfettiartige Flecken, die das Originalbild fast verdecken.

Er verkaufte seine Lebensmittelkarten, um Kunstmaterial zu kaufen. Nun ersetzte die Natur figurative Darstellungen. Sonnenuntergänge, Sonnenaufgänge, Wiesen, Wälder, Blumen und Bäume dominierten seine Arbeit.

In Ascher c. 1960 Sonnenuntergang vermischen sich kühne Pinselstriche mit malerischen Laufspuren. Die Malspuren laufen in alle Richtungen, was darauf hindeutet, dass der Künstler beim Malen die noch feuchte Leinwand umgedreht hat, wodurch eine hoch aufgeladene Landschaft entsteht, die vor Ausdruck platzt.

Ölgemälde, Gouachen und Aquarelle dickstämmiger, alter Bäume und dünnstämmiger Setzlinge werden mit anthropomorphen Eigenschaften lebendig.

Die Bäume in Hügeliger Landschaft, 1968, Aschers letztes bekanntes datiertes Werk und das letzte Werk in der Ausstellung der Grey Art Gallery, zeigt vier Bäume – drei auf der linken Seite der Leinwand und einen auf der rechten Seite. Zwischen ihnen beschreibt ein Stück Grün und Gelb den Aufstieg eines kleinen Hügels, über dem sich ein blau-weißer Himmel befindet. Im Gegensatz zu früheren Waldgemälden, in denen die Bäume Lichtungen verdecken, öffnet sich das Zentrum des späten Werks zum Licht. Das folgende undatierte Gedicht greift dasselbe Motiv auf.

DURCHSONNTER WALD
Durch sein Geheimnis
goldet Licht –
In Flimmer, warmen Glanzes
prangend.
Und alle Leben
doppelnd sangen.

Dort wo es schmeicheln
hingeküsst –
: Quillt eine Liebe
ohne Gleichen.
(Gedichtband 1, undatiert, S. 92)

Ascher starb am 26. März 1970. Er wurde auf einem städtischen Friedhof im Südwesten Berlins begraben. Martha starb im folgenden Jahr am 24. Januar und wurde neben ihm begraben.

Bitte verpassen Sie diese Ausstellung nicht.

2019-03-26T08:09:16+00:00March 26th, 2019|Select Press Coverage|Comments Off on 2019, March 18 – Art With Hillary – Part II